Aug 142013
 

While I can’t wait to tell you about the Heavy Seas Loose Cannon IPA I tasted yesterday, I’m taking a break from DC Beer week because, after almost a year hiatus, today is the return of Wine Blogging Wednesday (WBW)! The theme for WBW#80 is dry rosé.

Wine Bloggin Wednesday GlassFor the uninitiated, WBW it’s a designated day for wine lovers everywhere to write a post (or blog comment, tweet, pin, etc.) on the same wine-related theme.  You don’t have to be a wine blogger to participate, just a wine lover that wants to share what you’re enjoying (or not enjoying) with others, although your post should obviously be about the month’s topic.  Truthfully, WBW is one of my favorite times of the month both as a blogger and a wine lover because it gives me a chance to not only learn about new wines, but also see the different ways wine lovers approach the same theme.  I’ve participated in a number WBWs over the years, and it’s always fun. So, welcome back Wine Blogging Wednesday!

And with that WBW introduction, I’m onto the important part…the wine.  Long-time readers know about my love affair with Storybook Mountain Vineyards, and in particular, their Zinfandel.  Therefore, it shouldn’t be a surprise that I couldn’t restrain myself after receiving an email saying they had a Zin Gris Rosé for sale.  It was the first time I’d seen a rosé made from their luscious Zinfandel grapes, so I scooped up several bottles immediately.

2012 Storybook Mountain Vineyards Zin Gris

2012 Storybook Mountain Vineyards Zin Gris

The 2012 Storybook Mountain Vineyards Zin Gris (winery) is made with organic grapes grown in the Calistoga area of Napa Valley, California.  The wine is a medium-to-dark salmon pink.  On the nose, there were strawberries, cranberries, and a hint of limes and thyme.  In the mouth, there were cranberries, limes, and hints of strawberries and thyme.  The wine had a light body with bright acidity.

Is this worth a glass after work? It’s worth more than one!  What are you waiting for?  At $19, this is my kind of rose.  The website explains that the wine is made from “fully mature grapes [that] are slowly barrel fermented to dryness in cool century-old caves,” and I feel like I could taste everything wonderful about those grapes.  The wine was full of flavor, but yet still light and refreshing.

I opened the first bottle at the condo association’s summer cookout on our building’s rooftop.  It was a hot July day, and the wine was a perfect way to stay cool.  Plus, it paired nicely cookout food because the acidity helped to cut down on the grease and heaviness of the hot dogs, hamburgers, and snacks.  Admittedly, I only had a chance to pour myself one glass because the bottle was gone by the time I went back for a second.  I was clearly not the only one who enjoyed the rosé.

I opened the second bottle for “date night.”  Before heading to Wolf Trap for a night of Video Game Live with the National Symphony Orchestra, Hubby made a chorizo and penne pasta dish with a salad, which was a nice pairing because the wine didn’t overpower the strong spiciness of the pasta dish while still complimenting both the meat and the salad nicely.  I actually enjoyed this bottle for another couple of days, pairing it with Hubby’s homemade crab cakes for dinner one night and with my knitting and So You Think You Can Dance on the other night.

I’m saving my third bottle of this Zin Gris for the end of grilling season. I will probably gather the Wine Ladies on the rooftop deck, so we can say goodbye to summer in style and with good wine.

All in all, the Storybook Mountain Vineyards Zin Gris was everything I hope for in a rose—under $20; crisp and flavorful, but not overpowering; and perfect for sipping and relaxing.

Question of the Day: Have you had a dry rosé recently?  Give us the scoop!

Price: $19
Purchased at Storybook Mountain Vineyards website
Overall: 4.5 Corks

  One Response to “Return of Wine Blogging Wednesday with a Storybook Rosé”

  1. […] doubt about it, there’s a plethora of sweet, pink wine to choose from. But true rosés — such as those from Provence — are dry by law. The wines have little to no residual sugar […]

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