5 American White Wines for July 4

5 American White Wines for July 4 – July 4 cookouts are mean lots of good food, friends, and alcohol...and many people enjoy a nice glass of white wine. However, finding one that fits a BBQ atmosphere can be difficult. These wines are good options for all levels of wine drinkers. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

5 American White Wines for July 4 – July 4 cookouts are mean lots of good food, friends, and alcohol…and many people enjoy a nice glass of white wine. However, finding one that fits a BBQ atmosphere can be difficult. These wines are good options for all levels of wine drinkers. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

Earlier this week, I posted some suggestions for American sparkling and rosé wines to open over this upcoming holiday weekend. Today is all about the white wine options, as white wine and warm summer weather were practically made for each other. I will apologize upfront to the Chardonnay lovers for not having one on the list. I normally would have at least one, but these other wines were really the ones that were striking my fancy for the Fourth of July. And with that, 5 white wine suggestions of your cookout:

2014 Lilly's Viognier from The Winery at Bull Run– This $29 bottle of white wine from Virginia is a little pricey, but it’s beautiful. It’s the type of wine that’s meant to be sipped slowly with friends on a hot summer day. Rating: 3.5 out of 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

2014 Lilly’s Viognier from The Winery at Bull Run

The 2014 Lilly’s Viognier (winery) is a beautiful white wine from Virginia. It’s a light lemon color with a bright floral nose. In the mouth, thee are apricots and white pepper mixed with hints of grapefruit and honeysuckle. Considering my iffy feelings about Viognier, I was surprised how much I loved this wine. At first I thought it might have been because I tasted it during a visit to the winery, but I bought a bottle that I opened at home and enjoyed it as much, if not more, than I did during my winery visit. I gave this wine 3.5 corks and purchased it for $29.

Barefoot Sauvignon Blanc - This $8 white wine from California is not a complex wine, but it’s easy to drink and has a great quality-price ratio. If you’re having a lot of people over, this is a wine people will be happy to drink…especially outside on a hot summer day. Rating: 3.5 out of 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

Barefoot Sauvignon Blanc

The Barefoot Sauvignon Blanc (website) is a white wine from California. This wine is like drinking summer in a glass. It’s light and full of honeydew melons, nectarines, and limes. It’s not a complex wine, but it’s easy to drink and has a great quality-price ratio. If you’re having a lot of people over, this is a white that people will be happy to drink…especially outside on a hot summer day. I gave this wine 3.5 corks and received it as a sample, but the SRP is $8.

2014 Chateau St. Michelle Cold Creek Riesling – At $20, this white wine from Washington state would be the perfect wine for a summer salad, cold chicken, or just to sip on with good friends and conversation. Rating: 4 out of 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

2014 Chateau St. Michelle Cold Creek Riesling

The 2014 Chateau Ste. Michelle Cold Creek Riesling (winery)is a white wine from Washington state that has a touch of sweetness, nice acidity, and is incredibly drinkable. The wine has aromas and flavors of ripe peaches and apricots mixed with honey and a hint of ginger. It’s refreshing and will pair nicely with the summer salads and cold fried chicken, or can be enjoyed all on it’s own. I gave this wine 4 Corks and purchased it for $20.

This $13 bottle of white wine from Idaho is full of tropical and stone fruits mixed with Lemonheads candy, honey, and flowers. The touch of sweetness mixed with the acidity should make it a nice pairing with the ham, lamb, or turkey. Rating 4 out of 5. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

Sawtooth Riesling

The Sawtooth Reisling (winery, amazon) is one of my summer house white wines. It’s full of tropical and stone fruits mixed with Lemonheads candy, honey, and flowers. There’s also a hint of ginger. The touch of sweetness mixed with the acidity should make it a nice pairing with hot dogs and steamed crabs. A sign that I’m live fairly close to the Chesapeake is I find there are few things as enjoyable as pairing this wine with something that has been seasoned with Old Bay. I gave it 4 corks and usually purchase it for about $13.

Bouchaine Vineyards Estate Pinot Gris - This $30 white wine from Napa California is a little pricey for an everyday wine or a large gathering, but is a perfect palate-pleaser for a more intimate gathering. It’s an enjoyable sipper that is worth the extra cost. Rating: 4 out of 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

2012 Bouchaine Vineyards Estate Pinot Gris

The Bouchaine Vineyards Pinot Gris (winery) is a light-to-medium bodied white wine from Napa, California. The wine has a nice lime, grapefruit, and tart Granny Smith apple characteristics that mix with hints of nectarines and thyme. It’s a little pricey for a large gathering, but if you’re doing something a little more intimate, this Pinot Gris is sure to be a guest-pleaser. I gave this wine 4 corks and purchased it for $30.

Question of the Day:  What’s your favorite white wine for a cookout or picnic?

5 American Sparkling & Rosé Wines for July 4

5 American Sparkling and Rosé Wines for July 4 – July 4 cookouts are mean lots of good food, friends, and alcohol, but finding a sparkling or rose wine that fits a BBQ atmosphere can be difficult. These 5 wines are perfect options, and they’re all under $25. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

5 American Sparkling and Rosé Wines for July 4 – July 4 cookouts are mean lots of good food, friends, and alcohol, but finding a sparkling or rose wine that fits a BBQ atmosphere can be difficult. These 5 wines are perfect options, and they’re all under $25. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

I can’t believe there is only a week to go until July 4th, but that means it’s time to make final wine preparations.  As long time readers know, I will often open sparkling wine for myself on Independence Day because bubbly and fireworks just go together.  And, as I’ve definitely become more of a rosé drinker over the last few years, I can’t deny that I’ve started to associate summer with drinking pink wine.  So, to kick off my week of Fourth of July wine recommendations, here are some sparkling and rosé wines from the United States that you should consider.  All of them are under $25 and delicious!

Gruet Blanc de Noirs – This $13 bottle of sparkling wine from New Mexico is dry with beautiful, persistent bubbles. The bubbly tastes of berries, baked pears with hints of toast, cream, and vanilla. It’s delicious on its own or mixed with your favorite fruit juice for a champagne cocktail. Rating 4 out 5. Cheers! | AGlassAfterWork.com

Gruet Blanc de Noirs

The Gruet Blanc de Noirs is full of berry and baked pear flavors mixed with a hint of toast, cream, and vanilla.  The sparkler has nice acidity, which would make it a good pairing with both potato salad and hot dogs.  Plus, the price is perfect for buying multiple bottles without breaking the bank. I gave this wine 4 corks and purchased it for $13.

Mumm Napa Brut Rosé - At $24, this rose sparkling wine is light bodied, full of flavor, and easy to drink. It also comes in large formats, so it’s a perfect option for a summer cookout, New Year’s Eve party, or big family brunch. Rating: 4.5 Corks out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

Mumm Napa Brut Rosé

The Mumm Napa Brut Rosé tastes of cherries, strawberries, plums, and hints of whipped cream and yeast.  It has a light body and is very easy to drink (maybe a little too easy).  This bubbly also comes in large formats, so if you know that 750ml isn’t going to be enough, you can purchase a 3 liter or 6 liter bottle.  I gave this wine 4 corks and purchased the 750ml bottle for $19.20 (as a wine club member.  Regular price is $24).

Barefoot Perfectly Pink Spritzer- At $7, this sweet, rosé wine spritzer is easy to drink and very refreshing. One serving is also only 180 calories, but still is full of flavor. It would be great to enjoy at a cookout or during an summer evening with girlfriends. Rating: 3.5 Corks out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

Barefoot Perfectly Pink Spritzer

The Barefoot Perfectly Pink Spritzer surprised me…I admit it.  It’s all about ripe strawberries and raspberries mixed with juicy pineapple and hints of pink grapefruit.  It’s light-bodied, sweet, easy to drink, and very refreshing.  The acidity and spritz keeps the sweetness in check.  The key to this wine, though, is keeping it cold, so don’t be afraid to add an ice cube or two.  I definitely didn’t enjoy it as much as it warmed up.  I gave this wine 3.5 corks, and while I received it as a sample, the SRP is $7.

Storybook Mountain Zin Gris- At $25, this dry rosé wine from California is everything a pink wine should be. It’s a nice mixture of cranberries, limes, and thyme; it’s food-friendly; and it’s easy to drink. It would be the perfect wine for any picnic or cookout. Rating: 4.5 Corks out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

Storybook Mountain Zin Gris

The Storybook Mountain Zin Gris is my “house rosé.”  I haven’t done a separate review of it in a while, so I clearly need to, particularly as I drink it at home regularly.  It’s a nice mixture of cranberries, limes, and thyme, which creates something a little different in a rosé.  This wine is dry and is as enjoyable with food as without it.  I gave this wine 4.5 corks and purchased it for $22.50 (as a wine club member.  Regular price is $25).

2015 Mark Ryan Winery "The Vincent" Rosé - At $15, this dry rosé wine from Washington State is affordable, food-friendly, and very drinkable. Whether it’s a small gathering, a big cookout, or a romantic dinner, this wine would fit the mood without costing a fortune. Rating: 4.5 Corks out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

2015 Mark Ryan Winery “The Vincent” Rosé

The Mark Ryan Winery “The Vincent” Rosé is a perfect picnic or cookout wine.  There were fresh strawberries mixed with rose petals and lemon zest.  It’s a lighter bodied wine that still packs a powerful flavor punch without being overwhelming.  I only discovered this wine in May, but I suspect it will join the Storybook Mountain Zin Gris as a A Glass After Work house wine.  I gave this wine 4.5 corks and purchased it for $15.

Question of the Day:  Do you have your plans all set for the upcoming Canada Day or July 4th holiday weekend?  

Lambrusco Tasting at Osteria Morini

6 Lambrusco, Italian Sparkling Red Wines – Ranging from $7-$25, these wines range from dry to sweet, as well as from pale in color like a rose to inky purple like a sparkling red wine. All 6 wines are easy to drink and are perfect for pairing with food. The blog post includes details from a wine pairing dinner. | AGlassAfterWork.com

6 Lambrusco, Italian Sparkling Red Wines – Ranging from $7-$25, these wines range from dry to sweet, as well as from pale in color like a rose to inky purple like a sparkling red wine. All 6 wines are easy to drink and are perfect for pairing with food. The blog post includes details from a wine pairing dinner. | AGlassAfterWork.com

Banfi’s Lambrusco seminar at the 2015 Wine Bloggers Conference (WBC15) inspired the focus for this year’s tasting. In the WBC15 session, I learned that Lambrusco is the most purchased Italian red wine in U.S. retail chain stores. And, I realized that while I love ordering Lambrusco out at restaurants, I knew very little about the wine, I rarely bought a bottle to drink at home, and even less frequently wrote about it on the blog. So, I decided while still at the conference that 2016 was the year I would publically embrace Lambrusco, and what better way to do that than by organizing a Lambrusco wine dinner for my work colleagues.

Setup at Osteria Morini for 2016 Lambrusco Tasting

Setup at Osteria Morini for the Lambrusco tasting

At least once a year, my department does a team-building event. Several months after I started at this job, I offered to do an Albariño wine tasting for one of these gatherings. Since then, our annual staff bonding has occurred over food and wine. Usually, it’s just for the 15 people in my division that are located in DC. This year, however, the tasting ended up being while the regional members of our team were in town, so our size actually doubled. None of my coworkers are wine experts and only a couple could even recall ever having a Lambrusco before our dinner.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the wine, Lambrusco is a sparkling red wine made from a family of grapes that are unique to the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. This northern part of the country is about the size of Massachusetts and is particularly well known for the food that comes from the area. Therefore, it’s no surprise that Lambrusco makes for a perfect wine pairing with many of these items.

As luck would have it, one of my favorite Italian restaurants in DC–Osteria Morini–specializes in food from the Emilia-Romagna, so there was no question about holding the wine tasting dinner there.

Lineup for 2016 Lambrusco Tasting

Lambrusco tasting lineup

There were 6 different Lambruschi (the plural of Lambrusco), ranging from dry to sweet, as well as from pale in color like a rose to inky purple like a sparkling red wine.

Donelli Lambrusco di Sorbara

Donelli Lambrusco di Sorbara

Donelli Lambrusco di Sorbara (winery)
SRP: $15 (purchased in restaurant for $40 a bottle)
Grapes: 90% Lambrusco di Sorbara and 10% Lambrusco Salamino
Medium pink color with flecks of ruby and a pale pink foam
Roses and violets mixed with strawberries and raspberries
Lighter bodied with bright acidity.
3.5 Corks

Albinea Canali "FB" Lambrusco

Albinea Canali “FB” Lambrusco

Albinea Canali “FB” (winery, snooth)
SRP: $20 (*provided as a sample)
Grapes: 100% Lambrusco Sorbara
Pinkish-red
Fresh and fruity with lots of strawberries and hints of yeastiness that comes from the second fermentation in the bottle
Lighter bodied with refreshing tartness
Dry
4 Corks

Albinea Canali Ottocentonero

Albinea Canali Ottocentonero

Albinea Canali Ottocentonero (winery, snooth)
SRP: $20 (*provided as a sample)
Grapes: 50% Lambrusco Salamino, 40% Lambrusco Grasparossa, and 10% Lancellotta
Darker ruby with hints of purple and a pinkish foam
Cherries and blackcurrant on the nose
Flower petals and sour cherry in the mouth
Dry, almost bitter finish with bright acidity, but pleasantly so.
3.5 Corks

Riunite

Riunite

Riunite (website, snooth)
SRP: $7 (*provided as a sample)
Grapes: Lambrusco Maestri, Lambrusco Marani, Lambrusco Salamino, Lambrusco Montericco, and Lancellotta
Dark ruby with hints of violet and purplish, foamy top.
Big and fruity—strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and cherries
Medium bodied with soft tannins.
Sweet
4.5 Corks

Fattoria Moretto Lambrusco Grasparossa

Fattoria Moretto Lambrusco Grasparossa

2013 Fattoria Moretto Monovitigno
Cost: $25 from Wine Library
Grapes: 100% Lambrusco Grasparossa
Dark, purplish ruby with a nice foam top
Mixture of strawberries and blackberries with hints of sour cherry, rose petals, and something herby
Medium bodied with soft tannins
Hint of sweetness
4.5 Corks

Bell'Agio

Bell’Agio

Bell’Agio (website, snooth)
SRP: $15 (*provided as a sample)
Grapes: Lambrusco Salamino and Lambrusco Grasparossa
Dark ruby with hints of purple and foamy top
Mixture of raspberry and blackberries
Full-bodied with a bit of acid and soft tannins
Luscious and sweet
4 Corks

2016 Lambrusco Tasting Menu at Osteria Morini

2016 Lambrusco Tasting Menu at Osteria Morini

What I still love about these wine dinners is that they’re not just about the wines, but also about experiencing the wines with good food and company. And, the restaurant definitely didn’t let us down when it came to good food.

cheese and charcuterie board

cheese and charcuterie board

The evening started with a cheese and charcuterie board to go with our first Lambrusco–the Donelli Lambrusco di Sorbara, which is the only bottle we opened from the restaurants wine list. The Lambrusco and the boards were enjoyed cocktail hour style, with everyone standing our talking, eating, and sipping away. After that, we sat down to dinner at two long tables, where we indulged in a 4-course, family style dinner.

The Antipasti Course - Polpo alla Piastra, Polpettine, and Burrata

The Antipasti Course – Polpo alla Piastra, Polpettine, and Burrata

After the about 30 minutes of standing around talking, we settled into our seats for dinner. The Albinea Canali “FB” was served with the antipasti course–Polpo alla Piastra (charred octopus, fregola, and tomato); Polpettine (mortadella & prosciutto meatballs, pomodoro), which is one of my favorite dishes at Osteria Morini, and Burrata (house-made mozzarella, grapefruit, and pistachio). The FB is a lighter, drier style of Lambrusco. And, while the FB paired nicely with all three dishes, I could not get enough of combining it with the octopus. I kept taking a sip of wine, then a bit of octopus, and another sip of wine. It was one of the few dishes I went back for seconds on, even knowing how much more food was left to come.

The Primi course (rigitoni, gramigna, and cassarecce) with the Albinea Canali Ottocentonero

The Primi course (rigitoni, gramigna, and cassarecce) with the Albinea Canali Ottocentonero

For the second course (or Primi course), we opened the Albinea Canali Ottocentonero to drink with three different pasta dishes–a Rigatoni (made with braised wild mushrooms, rosemary oil, and parmigiano), a Gramigna (made with pork sausage, carbonara, and pecorino), and a Cassarecce (a squid ink pasta with scallops, squid, rapini, and calabrian chili). The Gramigna is usually my go-to dish at the restaurant, but I think that’s because I never had the Cassarecce before. The Cassarecce was my favorite of the night, and when put with the acidity and flavors of the Lambrusco, both the food and the wine came to life in a way that took what was already enjoyable individually and just made them sing together.

The main course (or secondi) actually featured two Lambruschi–Riunite and 2013 Fattoria Moretto Monovitigno–and they were paired with several different types of meats–Anatra (duck breast, spaetzle, trumpet mushrooms, spinach, radish); Branznio (Mediterranean seabass, chickpeas, charred broccoli, taggaisca olives, and bagna cauda); and Grigliata Mista (lamb porterhouse, pork ribs, chicken sausage, and hanger steak). Our side dishes, which I somehow missed getting a picture of, were Patata Fritti (crispy red bliss potatoes with pecorino) and Spinaci (buttered spinach).

The Secondi Course - Anatra, Branzino, and Grigliata Mista

The Secondi Course – Anatra, Branzino, and Grigliata Mista

The Riunite has a bit of sweetness, definitely more than the Fattoria Moretto Monovitigno, but that made the pairings even more interesting because everyone agreed that both wines matched the food beautifully. Several coworkers mentioned that they never really experienced a “good” pairing and the difference it can make in how the wine and the food both taste, but that this course really highlighted the possibilities for them.

It’s also worth noting that during this course, we tasted both the least and most expensive wines of the night. Interestingly, they were also both the favorite wines of the night. When it came to these two in particular, since we were tasting side-by-side, I asked everyone to show their hand for preferences before reveling the cost of the retail cost of the wines, and it was split almost exactly down the middle.

Dolci course with the Bell'Agio

Dolci course with the Bell’Agio

Finally, we finished the evening off with our last Lambrusco–the Bell’Agio–and dessert (Dolci course). This Lambrusco was the sweetest of the night, and its sweetness was particularly nice with the flavors of the Tiramisu (mascarpone mousse, lady finger, amaretto, and coffee crema) and Torta al Cioccolato (chocolate ganache and praline crunch).

Overall, the tasting was a huge success! I’ve had several coworkers follow-up when they’ve ordered Lambrusco at a restaurant or bought a bottle to share at home, and that is the ultimate sign of success for me. A special thanks to Joe and Dino at Banfi for generously providing 4 of the 6 wines we tasted and to Jonna, Rubio, and the rest of the Osteria Morini DC team for an unforgettably delicious evening.

Question of the Day: Have you ever had Lambrusco? If so, what are your thoughts on the type of wine? Do you have a favorite?

Origium Garnacha – Beautiful, Bold, and Under $10

*** I received this wine as a sample. ***

2014 Origium Garnacha – At $10, this Spanish red wine has an amazing quality-price ratio. This wine would be perfect for girls’ night -- talking and laughing over a plate of Jamón Serrano, Manchego cheese. Everyone will think you splurged on the bottle, even though you didn’t. So, what are you waiting for? Grab a bottle and your girlfriends. Cheers! Ratings 4.5 out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com
Roy Lichtenstein's Bull I, Bull II, Bull III, Bull IV and Bull V from the Bull Profile series

Roy Lichtenstein’s Bull I, Bull II, Bull III, Bull IV, and Bull V from the Bull Profile series

Last Saturday was Hubby’s birthday, so instead of doing our normal weekend errands, we spent the day walking around DC and visiting the special exhibits at the National Gallery of Art. We love going to the museums during the winter because they’re usually less crowded, but the Power and Pathos exhibit, which displayed 50 bronze statues from the fourth century BCE to the first century CE, was surprisingly packed. The Serial Impulse at Gemini G.E.L. exhibit, on the other hand, was virtually empty and more how we expected to find the entire museum. I preferred the Power and Pathos exhibit, but seeing both was a fun and Hubby seemed really happy with how it all worked out.

Inside Hubby's homemade birthday ice cream sandwich

Inside Hubby’s homemade birthday ice cream sandwich

After the museums, we had a few hours at home relaxing before heading out to dinner at Charlie Palmer Steak and then came home for some homemade birthday ice cream sandwiches. I, of course, paired mine with wine.

The 2014 Origium Garnacha (winery) is from Carinena, Spain and is made with 100% Garnacha grapes. The wine was a deep ruby with flecks of purple. On the nose, there were strawberries and black cherries with hints of white pepper and something floral (roses maybe?). In the mouth, there were black cherries, strawberries and raspberries followed by something floral. The wine was medium-to-full bodied with low-to-medium acidity and tannins.

2014 Origium Garnacha – At $9, this Spanish red wine has an amazing quality-price ratio. This wine would be perfect for girls’ night -- talking and laughing over a plate of Jamón Serrano, Manchego cheese.  Everyone will think you splurged on the bottle, even though you paid under $10.  So, what are you waiting for? Grab a bottle and your girlfriends.  Cheers! Ratings 4.5 out 5 | AGlassAfterWork.com

2014 Origium Garnacha

Is this worth a glass after work? It’s worth more than one!  What are you waiting for? With an SRP of $9, don’t walk…run…to buy this wine. When I taste press samples, I always go through and take my own notes before l read the accompanying information because I rather not be influenced ahead of time. I expected this wine to be double the cost, so to say I was shocked when I saw it was less than $10 would be an understatement.

I was sorry I didn’t have Origium Garnacha to go with my steak and potatoes from dinner because would have made for a really nice pairing–big enough flavors to not get lost in the steak, but not such a big wine that it would have overpowered the meal. This would also be a great wine to pair with a cheese and charcuterie plate, particularly if you have Jamón Serrano and Manchego. Ultimately, I paired the wine with my chocolate chip cookie ice cream sandwich, which worked surprisingly well, and then simply enjoyed another glass while indulging in an evening of food-coma laziness.

Question of the Day: Do you have special birthday celebration traditions, like baking a particular type of cake or going to a specific restaurant, or do you tend to take each birthday as it comes?

Suggested Retail Price: $9
Received as a sample.
Overall: 4.5 Corks

Ruffino’s $10 Chianti

*** I received this wine as a sample. ***

Moleskin wine journalI admit it…even though I love technology and all the apps that make writing a wine blog and being active on social media so fun, there is nothing quite like writing my tasting notes in a journal. Every year, I get a new Moleskine, and at this point, I actually keep wine journal and beer journal. I just love grabbing that black book with its thick off-white pages and my glass full of liquid possibility and entering my zone for a few moments to really think about what I’m drinking. Then, I scribble down all my thoughts and impressions. At the end of the year, I love to look back on the memories on everything I drank.

Inside my 2016 wine journalI get it. It’s old-school.   It’s duplicative, especially since I usually post my thoughts on Vivino or UnTappd and Instagram soon after tasting. I can’t help it. I still love it.

My first wine of the year was the 2013 Ruffino Chianti (winery, snooth), which was made in the Chianti region of Italy with 70% Sangiovese grapes and 30% other undisclosed varieties. The wine was a clear medium ruby. On the nose, there was the classic cherries and violets. In the mouth, there were slightly sour cherries with hints of violets and herbs. The wine was light-to-medium bodied with low-to-medium tannins and high acidity.

2013 Ruffino Chianti - This $10 Italian red wine is nice on the wallet and begs to be paired with a pepperoni pizza. | AGlassAfterWork.com

2013 Ruffino Chianti

Is this worth a glass after work? Sure…you won’t be drinking anything out of the ordinary, but you’ll have a decent, reliable glass. At an SRP of $10, is inexpensive and ok with food. Hubby and I made our own little holiday dinner that first weekend in January, so I paired the wine with turkey and mashed potatoes. The pairing worked nicely, although the wine really was screaming “drink me with pepperoni pizza.” After dinner, I continued to enjoy the wine while knitting on the couch and watching trashy TV, which was a nice way to spend the evening even if the acidity in the wine was a bit much. All in all, this isn’t a wine I would search out, but at the same time, it’s also not a wine that I would avoid…especially if I had the right food.

Question of the Day: Do you keep some sort of written journal (either for food, wine, beer, or something else)?

Suggested Retail Price: $10
Received as a sample.
Overall: 3 Corks