Sunday Baking: Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies & K-9 Cruiser

Growing up, my family always celebrated the Jewish holidays as religious holidays. However, since my paternal grandfather was a non-practicing Catholic, we celebrated the Christian holidays, too. They were secular, family holidays with all of the festivities and decorations, but none of the religion. As a kid, it was the best of all worlds.

Hubby is not a religious person, although he enjoys celebrating the holidays in a secular way. So, it was easy for us to combine our traditions. Our first winter holiday season together, I introduced him to Chanukkah, but we also celebrated Christmas. Over the 12 years we’ve been together, our individual way of doing things has melded and morphed into our own traditions, although there is still plenty of food, drinking, presents, friends, and family.

This year, my Chanukkah present couldn’t have been any more perfect–Hubby gave me cookie press. Every time we were in a store with baking supplies, I mentioned wanting one, but it’s never what we were in the store to buy and it’s not the type of thing I ever “needed.” Once I had one, though, I had to test it right away…and getting one for Chanukkah meant I obviously needed to use it to make Christmas cookies. So, my last cookies of 2015 were Peppermint-Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies paired with Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale.

Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale

Flying Dog K-9 Cruiser Winter Ale

The Flying Dog K-9 Winter Ale (brewery) is an English Ale brewed in Frederick, Maryland.  The beer has a dark amber color with a foamy off-white head. On the nose, there were walnuts and figs mixed with a hint of cinnamon and something herbal. In the mouth, there was anise and nuts mixed with hints of pinecones and burnt sugar. The beer was medium body with good carbonation.

Is this worth a glass after work? Sure…you won’t be drinking anything out of the ordinary, but you’ll have a decent, reliable glass. At $1.50 for the single bottle, the K-9 is worth grabbing, but not something to go out of the way to buy. It used to be a winter beer staple for me, but for some reason, this year, I’m just not feeling it. It’s not that the beer is bad, but it doesn’t stand out as anything special either.

Peppermint Cream Cheese Spritz CookiesThe cookies, on the other hand, were exactly what I was hoping for. Unfortunately, I’m not supposed to eat wheat flour at the moment, so I only sampled them, but everything about them tasted like Christmas. They had a nice peppermint flavor without it being overwhelming. The cream cheese gave the cookies a nice texture without them being greasy. And, using the cookie press was a ton of fun.  I’m already planning my next cookie press adventure for Valentine’s Day.

Overall, with the weather in DC being so warm over the holidays, I really was counting on the cookies and beer to put me in the holiday spirit, and they definitely did. They weren’t the best pairing, but individually they both were wintery and festive. And, the cookies will undoubtedly become a new addition to our holiday traditions.

Question of the Day:  When you buy beer, do you tend ever buy the single bottles so you can make your own six-pack or do you tend to buy all the same beer at a time?  

Peppermint Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies
Print Recipe
These cookies are a bit of a twist on traditional spritz cookies, as there is some cream cheese mixed in with the butter and there is peppermint extract instead of vanilla. Even though this recipe calls for a cookie press, if you wanted to make regular shaped cookies with the dough, they would still be a huge hit. You just might want to chill it a little before baking, which is not something you need to do with the cookie press.
Servings
8 dozen cookies
Servings
8 dozen cookies
Peppermint Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies
Print Recipe
These cookies are a bit of a twist on traditional spritz cookies, as there is some cream cheese mixed in with the butter and there is peppermint extract instead of vanilla. Even though this recipe calls for a cookie press, if you wanted to make regular shaped cookies with the dough, they would still be a huge hit. You just might want to chill it a little before baking, which is not something you need to do with the cookie press.
Servings
8 dozen cookies
Servings
8 dozen cookies
Ingredients
Servings: dozen cookies
Instructions
  1. Preheat over to 350F
  2. In separate medium mixing bowl, combine flour and salt.
  3. In mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream together cubed butter and cream cheese.
  4. Add sugar and egg yolk. Beat until light and fluffy.
  5. Add peppermint. Beat until incorporated.
  6. Gradually add the flour mixture. Beat until incorporated
  7. Place dough in cookie press with desired disk. Press dough onto ungreased or parchment-lined cookie sheets.
  8. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until the cookies are golden brown on the edges.
  9. Let cool for several minutes before removing to cooling rack.

Price: $1.50 for a single bottle
Purchased at Harris Teeter
Overall: 3 Corks